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Skate, white

Rostroraja alba

Method of production - Caught at sea
Capture method - All applicable methods
Capture area - North East Atlantic (FAO 27)
Stock area - North East Atlantic
Stock detail - All Areas
Accreditation -
Fish type - White flat fish

Sustainability rating Click for explaination of rating

This fish, caught by the methods and in the area listed above, is the least sustainable fish to eat and should be avoided. Click on the rating icon above to read more and on the alternatives tab below to find sustainable fish to eat.


Sustainability overview

The white skate is now very rare in European waters and is assessed as Critically Endangered by IUCN - the International Conservation Union. ICES scientists estimate that white skate is severely depleted and possibly extirpated from most parts of the Celtic Seas. Avoid eating. Since January 2009 it has been prohibited for fishermen to retain, tranship or land white skate caught in EU waters, with fishermen required to return all white skate caught to the sea unharmed where possible.

Biology

White skates belong to the Rajidae family which includes skates and rays. The white skate is a large coastal and slope species growing to a maximum length of 200cm and weight of 77 kg. Size and age at maturity and maximum age are unknown.

Stock information

Stock area
North East Atlantic

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Stock information
White skates are at the northern edge of their range in UK waters. However, there is evidence that the abundance of white skate has declined dramatically in the Northeast Atlantic and has disappeared from the Irish Sea where it was once targeted commercially. The status of white skate cannot be evaluated in the absence of defined reference points. However, from landings and survey data, ICES estimates that white skate is severely depleted and possibly extirpated from most parts of the Celtic Sea, and there have been no records of this fish in recent scientific groundfish surveys. This species has a patchy and localized distribution and historically was common locally in some inshore areas of the Celtic Sea. ICES describes the extirpation of the species here as a cause of concern, and it is likely to be equally threatened in more southerly European waters, representing a potential loss in the fish diversity in the area. The International Conservation Union (IUCN) lists white skate as "Critically Endangered" in the Northeast Atlantic. It is also an EU Prohibited Species in areas IIa, III, IV, VI, VII, VIII, IX and X - meaning it cannot be targeted, retained, transhipped or landed, requiring them to be returned unharmed,where possible, to the sea.

Management

There is no management plan for this stock or any skate stock in the ICES area. There are however EU prohibitions on fishing for, retaining, transhipping and landing some species, including the most severely depleted species taken as bycatch in mixed demersal fisheries, thisincludes white skate. This is the highest protection possible under the EUs Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) and is a long-term conservation strategy aimed at very depleted and vulnerable species. ICES reviewed the listing of white skate in 2010 and supports it's inclusion on the Prohibited Species List.

Capture information

Skates and rays form an important component of mixed demersal fisheries, taken as bycatch in beam and otter trawls, in seine fisheries and also in targeted fisheries using lines and set nets. Under current EU legislation it is prohibited to fish for, retain on board, tranship or land white skate. Because it is an EU Prohibited Species any animal captured should be returned immediately and unharmed, where possible, to the sea.

Read more about capture methods

Alternatives

Based on method of production, fish type, and consumer rating: only fish rated 2 and below are included as an alternative in the list below . Click on a name to show the sustainable options available.

Dab Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Halibut, Atlantic Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Halibut, Pacific

Ray, blonde Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Ray, smalleyed Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Ray, spotted Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Ray, Thornback ray, Roker Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Sole, Dover sole, Common sole Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Turbot Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.


References
ICES Advice 2014, Book 9 http://www.ices.dk/sites/pub/Publication%20Reports/Advice/2014/2014/rja-nea.pdf; http:sharktrust.org

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