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Round-nose grenadier

Coryphaenoides rupestris

Method of production - Caught at sea
Capture method - Deep sea trawl
Capture area - North East Atlantic (FAO 27)
Stock area - All Areas
Stock detail - All applicable areas
Accreditation -
Fish type - White round fish

Sustainability rating Click for explaination of rating

This fish, caught by the methods and in the area listed above, is the least sustainable fish to eat and should be avoided. Click on the rating icon above to read more and on the alternatives tab below to find sustainable fish to eat.


Sustainability overview

Roundnose grenadier is slow growing, late to mature, long lived and has low reproductive capacity. They can therefore only sustain low levels of exploitation. They also exhibit aggreating behaviour which makes them vulnerable to exploitation. It is a deep-water species targeted by fisheries that are poorly regulated. It also occupies a habitat that is vulnerable to the impacts of trawling. Avoid eating.

Biology

Roundnose grenadier occurs in all types of deep-sea habitats at depths of 800 to 1800 m in the Northeast Atlantic and is found along the continental slope, on Rockall and Hatton banks, and on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. It occurs in shallower areas in the Skagerrak. In all areas the species has a slow growth and reaches high ages (>50 years). Along the continental slope, roundnose grenadier occurs mainly close to the seafloor; however, it forms more pelagic aggregation on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge where it is exploited with pelagic trawls. Roundnose grenadier matures at an age of 11 years (8–14 years according to certain studies) and the life cycle varies amongst populations, with spawning occurring throughout the year to the west of the British Isles and only in October–November.

Stock information

Stock area
All Areas

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Stock information
Roundnose grenadier is slow growing, late to mature, long lived and has low reproductive capacity. They can therefore only sustain low levels of exploitation. Stock status in these areas is unknown or there is insufficient information to determine reference points. Fisheries for this species should be accompanied by data collection programmes on target and bycatch fisheries, and scientific advice is that the fisheries should not be allowed to expand, unless they can be shown to be sustainable.

Management

There are no specific objectives for the management of this stock. It is considered incredibly difficult to manage a fishery for deepwater species sustainably; with the current poor data on the vast majority of deepsea fisheries, and poor understanding of the effects on the deepsea ecosystem and seabed, present knowledge is inadequate to provide sustainable advice. Due to the international nature of many of the deep sea fisheries on the high seas, compliance with any regulations can be low, and due to the difficulties in enforcement on the high seas, there can be huge problems with Illegal, Unregulated and Unreported catches.

Capture information

There are generally no directed fisheries for this species in these areas. It is taken as bottom trawl bycatch and in small amounts. Deep sea ecosystems are highly vulnerable and have a very low resilience, thus the impacts of any large scale removal of fish or abrasion of the seabed caused by fishing gear are likely to be severely detrimental with recovery slow, especially with regard to coldwater corals. Many deepsea fisheries are experimental and are targeted with heavy bottom trawling gear, which can decimate seamounts and ocean ridge ecosystems. As this fishery is part of a mixed fisheries, effort on roundnose grenadier also impacts other commercial and non-commercial deep-water species.

Read more about capture methods

Alternatives

Based on method of production, fish type, and consumer rating: only fish rated 2 and below are included as an alternative in the list below . Click on a name to show the sustainable options available.

Mullet, Red, Striped red mullet Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Alaska pollock, Walleye pollock Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Basa, Tra, Catfish or Vietnamese River Cobbler Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Bass, seabass Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Bream, Black or porgy or seabream

Bream, Gilthead Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Cod, Atlantic Cod Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Coley, Saithe Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Haddock Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Hake, Cape

Japanese amberjack, Yellowtail or Seriola

Meagre

Pouting or Bib

Sturgeon Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Tilapia

Whiting Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Wolffish


References
ICES Advice 2014, Book 9 http://www.ices.dk/sites/pub/Publication%20Reports/Advice/2014/2014/Roundnose%20grenadier.pdf

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