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Plaice

Pleuronectes platessa

Method of production - Caught at sea
Capture method - Seine net
Capture area - North East Atlantic (FAO 27)
Stock area - Skagerrak
Stock detail - Subdivision 20
Accreditation -
Fish type - White flat fish

Sustainability rating Click for explaination of rating

This fish, caught by the methods and in the area listed above, is not a good choice of sustainable fish to eat and should be only eaten very occasionally. Click on the rating icon above to read more and on the alternatives tab below to find more sustainable fish to eat.


Sustainability overview

Plaice is a long-lived species and subject to high fishing pressure. The state of the stock in this area is unknown and advice is that landings from the Western component of the stock should be no more than 8972 t and that in the depleted Eastern Skaggerak, no directed fisheries should occur.

Biology

Plaice is a bottom-dwelling flatfish. It spawns in the early months of the year (January to March) and sometimes makes long spawning migrations. North Sea plaice reach between 35 and 45cm in their 6th year. It is a long-lived species, becoming sexually mature at 3-7 years (females) 2-6 (males) and living 30 years or more. Maximum reported age 50 years.

Stock information

Stock area
Skagerrak

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Stock information
The plaice stock in the Skagerrak consists of an Eastern and Western component. The latter is closely associated with the North Sea stock. Catches in the Western component normally constitute at least 90-95% of the total catches. 2012 is the first year ICES has advised on plaice for the Skagerrak separately. There is insufficient information available to evaluate the stock hence stock status and fishing mortality are unknown. The two components of the stock show different trends in biomass - a 17% increase in the Western and a 70% decrease in the Eastern component. Fishing mortality is unknown, but effort has reduced. Scientific advice is that landings from the Western component of the stock should be no more than 8972 t in 2014. And that in the depleted Eastern Skaggerak, no directed fisheries should occur and bycatch and discards should be minimised.

Management

Capture information

Plaice is caught all year round with a predominance from spring to autumn. In Skagerrak, plaice is taken both in a directed fishery and in a mixed fishery with cod, Nephrops, sole and plaice, especially with trawlers with 90 mm mesh size. Most plaice in the Skagerrak are caught by a directed small-scale fishery operating with seines and gillnets, and the discards are estimated to be low (92% of total catch in 2011 was landed and 8% discarded). Of this 34% is fished using demersal seine; 29% demersal otter trawl; and 5% beam trawl. The minimum landing size for plaice in EU waters is 27cm. The approximate size at which 50% of females mature or first spawn is around 30-34cm. Seine netting causes less disturbance to seabed than demersal otter trawling.

Read more about capture methods

Alternatives

Based on method of production, fish type, and consumer rating: only fish rated 2 and below are included as an alternative in the list below . Click on a name to show the sustainable options available.

Dab Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Halibut, Atlantic Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Halibut, Pacific

Sole, Dover sole, Common sole Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Turbot Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.


References
ICES Advice 2013, Book 6

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