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Haddock

Melanogrammus aeglefinus

Method of production - Caught at sea
Capture method - Longline
Capture area - North East Atlantic (FAO 27)
Stock area - Faroe Plateau
Stock detail - Vb
Accreditation -
Fish type - White round fish

Sustainability rating Click for explaination of rating

This fish, caught by the methods and in the area listed above, is the least sustainable fish to eat and should be avoided. Click on the rating icon above to read more and on the alternatives tab below to find sustainable fish to eat.


Sustainability overview

ICES advises that there be no directed fishery on haddock in 2015, measures be put in place to minimise bycatch of haddock in other fisheries and a recovery plan implemented as a prerequisite to reopening the directed fishery. Avoid eating.

Biology

Haddock is a cold-temperate (boreal) species. It is a migratory fish, found in inshore shallow waters in summer and in deep water in winter. Smaller than cod, it can attain a length of 70-100cms and can live for more than 20 years. It spawns between February and June, but mostly in March and April. In the North Sea haddock become sexually mature at an age of 3-4 years and a length of 30-40cm. Maturity occurs later and at greater lengths in more northern areas of its range.

Stock information

Stock area
Faroe Plateau

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Stock information
Biomass for this stock has decreased since 2003 and since 2010 has been estimated to be below B lim. Given the recent poor recruitment, slow growth and low biomass ICES continues to advise that there be no directed fishery on haddock, measures be put in place to minimise bycatch of haddock in other fisheries and a recovery plan implemented as a prerequisite to reopening the directed fishery.

Management

There is no explicit management plan for this stock. A Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY) based plan has however been proposed but not yet approved by the authorities. An effort management system based on the number of fishing days, closed areas and other technical measures was implemented in 1996 to ensure sustainable exploitation of stocks in the area. This has however not achieved the expected reduction of fishing on depleted stocks.

Capture information

Haddock are mainly caught in a directed longline fishery for cod and haddock and as bycatches in trawl fisheries for saithe. Normally longlining accounts for 80-90% of catches. In 2013 longliners accounted for 78% of the 3kt catch with trawlers taking the rest. Longlining is a less fuel intensive and generally a more selective method of fishing. However, this fishery is responsible for bycatch of juvenile and young haddock. There is also possible bycatch of shark and other non-target species, including seabirds. The minimum landing size for haddock in EU waters is 30cm (27cm in Skaggerak/Kattegat).

Read more about capture methods

Alternatives

Based on method of production, fish type, and consumer rating: only fish rated 2 and below are included as an alternative in the list below . Click on a name to show the sustainable options available.

Alaska pollock, Walleye pollock Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Basa, Tra, Catfish or Vietnamese River Cobbler Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Bass, seabass Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Bream, Gilthead Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Cod, Atlantic Cod Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Coley, Saithe Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Haddock Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Hake, Cape

Japanese amberjack, Yellowtail or Seriola

Meagre

Pouting or Bib

Sturgeon Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.

Tilapia

Whiting Depending on how and where it's caught this species ranges from sustainable to unsustainable. Click the name to display only the sustainable options.


References
ICES Advice 2014, Book 4 http://www.ices.dk/sites/pub/Publication%20Reports/Advice/2014/2014/had-faro.pdf

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